Elise Wogensen defends her PhD thesis at the Department of Psychology – University of Copenhagen

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Elise Wogensen defends her PhD thesis at the Department of Psychology

Kandidat

Elise Wogensen

Titel

Exercise as a tool for supporting cognitive recovery after acquired brain injury: An animal model-based investigation”.The Thesis will be available for reading at the Library of Social Science, Gothersgade 140, 1353 Copenhagen K.

Time and venue

Tuesday the 23rd May 2017 at 14:00. University of Copenhagen, Faculty Library of Social Science, aud. 1., Gothersgade 140, 1353 Copenhagen K. Kindly note that the defense will start precisely at the  announced time.                     

Assessment Committee     

  • Associate Professor, Signe Vangkilde, (chairman), Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen
  • Professor, Mårten Risling, Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet,         Stockholm, Sweden       
  • Professor, Jørgen Scheel-Krüger, Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus Univeristy

Abstract

The thesis investigates the use of exercise as a tool to promote cognitive recovery after acquired brain injury (ABI) in animal model-based studies. It consists of a systematic review examining the current status of preclinical research on the cognitive effects of post-ABI exercise (study I), and three experimental studies examining the effects of exercise on cognitive recovery in a rodent model of mechanically induced brain injury (studies II, III, and IV). Study II investigates the effects of different postinjury starting points of exercise; study III investigates the effects of two different types of exercise, and study IV examine the effects of different (temporal) distribution of exercise. Study I indicates that exercise can support cognitive recovery in some cases, yet overall conclusions as to when, what, and how much exercise should be administered after ABI cannot currently be drawn. Study II found a marked cognitive recovery effect of voluntary exercise administered in the later posttraumatic phase, however, this finding was not replicated in studies III and IV. No recovery effects of different frequency and distribution of exercise sessions were found. The results of the four studies indicate, that the efficacy of post-ABI exercise possibly relies on a complex array of inter-connected factors that influence the potential of exercise as a general recovery-promoting method.

Exercise as a tool for supporting cognitive recovery after acquired brain injury: An animal model-based investigation”.